Answering former FL DoC Secretary McDonough’s question

More Correctional Officers Arrested in Rikers Island Investigation – The Prison Complex

Jail beatings rarely result in prosecution, but there are exceptions. In June last year, the Bronx district attorney’s office charged 10 jail officers and supervisors, including a former Rikers security chief, with savagely beating an inmate and then conspiring to cover up the attack. The inmate, Jahmal Lightfoot, suffered two fractured eye sockets and a broken nose. After the beating, officers then accused Mr. Lightfoot — wrongfully, according to prosecutors — of slashing one of the officers with a makeshift razor.

via More Correctional Officers Arrested in Rikers Island Investigation – The Prison Complex.

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Arrests must become commonplace for law enforcement officers and corrections officers who use excessive force or otherwise abuse their authority.

Those who believe themselves to be above the law are a danger to society, whether they’re gang-bangers or public servants.

Former Florida Department of Corrections Secretary James McDonough agrees, and he’s called out the current DoC Secretary as well as Governor Rick Scott over inmate deaths and abuses here similar to abuses at Rikers Island and elsewhere across the nation.

In that article, McDonough was quoted as saying:

“There is only so much that can be feigned as we ‘wait for the conclusion of an official investigation’,” he wrote. “These cases did not end tragically last week; they ended in horrific and suspicious deaths some years ago.  Where has the leadership been?”

McDonough additionally asked, “Where is the outrage?”

The answer to this question is clear, via the ongoing New York arrests for inmate abuses, the lengthy-as-it-was-deceptive speech delivered by current Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Michael Crews, and the silence of Rick Scott.

The answer is “Elsewhere.”

 

 

About Susan Chandler

Now-disabled interior/exterior designer dragged into battling conviction corruption from its periphery in a third personal battle with civil public corruption.
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