Gov. Scott: Don’t execute Waterhouse today, use your executive authority for public safety, not sickening sideshows

From: Susan Chandler
Date: February 15, 2012 8:48:36 AM EST
To: Rick.Scott@eog.myflorida.com
Cc: ASKDOJ , antitrust.complaints@usdoj.gov, Tampa Division , miami@ic.fbi.gov, Senator Mike Haridopolos , Speaker Cannon , irsob@do.treas.gov, *TIGTA Investigations Complaints Unit , ACLU Romero
Subject: DON’T EXECUTE ROBERT WATERHOUSE TODAY; stop ignoring conviction corruption, start making justice available

The Honorable Governor Rick Scott
Office of the Governor
The Capitol
400 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor Scott,

I am writing to insist once more that you commute Robert Waterhouse’s death sentence, and turn your attention to public safety by investigating and prosecuting Florida’s rampant conviction corruption. I also now ask that you demand that the federal government move rapidly to restore ethical forensics DNA test prices and reasonable test time frames to documented 2004 levels, or better.

Amnesty International posted an online petition on Robert Waterhouse’s behalf in an attempt to have you pay attention to the sworn statement of a “new witness.” A more apt description of the man would be “ignored witness” – there is nothing new in his sworn statement describing how Waterhouse left the bar with two other men – not Deborah Kammerer. The witnessed was interviewed right after the homicide; officers were not interested in his statement and even accused him of trying to protect a murderer.

Amnesty also wants you to pay attention to the destruction of evidence that made it impossible to conduct the DNA tests that Waterhouse requested, pointing to a Virginia governor’s opinion in commuting a death sentence that evidence destruction “breached the public trust in the system.”

I’ll additionally point out that Waterhouse likely wouldn’t have requested DNA tests if he knew they would incriminate him. Evidence destruction isn’t always innocent in Florida, which you would already know as fact if you were willing to address Brevard County’s evidence mêlée that’s already of record with the governor’s office via my previous correspondence. I will trouble myself to restate some of it.

Related evidence from William Dillon’s case and Gary Bennett’s case arrived in suspect condition at Orchid Cellmark’s Farmers Branch, TX facility in 2008 and 2010, respectively. Dillon’s evidence was unsealed but testable; he was freed. Bennett’s was sealed but reportedly untestable, and he remains incarcerated, even though he was convicted a year after Dale Sutton’s upset conviction proved dog handler John Preston was unable to track scent and unwilling to truthfully state his credentials under oath. Sutton was freed in January of 1983, which means that Bennett has now been wrongfully incarcerated for 28 years. Sutton’s upset conviction was within the knowledge of Brevard prosecutors and public defenders alike at the time of Bennett’s prosecution, according to the media. Preposterously, it looks like Bennett will be denied parole unless his sister’s petition is successful … Florida’s eagerness to bury mistakes and malice is sometimes screamingly obvious.

A Florida Department of Law Enforcement expert witness deliberately misrepresented DNA test results in Jeffrey Abramowski’s trial … the DNA pointed directly to Judy Foley and Michael Bruce Foley, and away from Abramowski. Fingerprints also belonged to the Foleys, not Abramowski, and it was the Foleys that fled, not Abramowski, and the Foleys found in possession of victim Cortney Crandall’s possessions, not Abramowski. The knife purchase that the Brevard Sheriff’s Office claimed placed Abramowski in Melbourne rather than Orlando backfired, my ex-SEAL friends steered me to Gerber’s sales manager at the time … Walmart didn’t sell black-bladed knives in Melbourne or anywhere else, so Abramowski couldn’t have purchased one there. The sales manager was very familiar with the now-defunct Orlando store where Abramowski purchase the knife. I’ve followed the money; it didn’t lead to Abramowski … he didn’t collect any insurance money from the victim’s death.

Crime scene fingerprints that didn’t match Monte Adams were never “run,” even though they could have exonerated Adams, and even though there are unsolved homicides at Cocoa gas stations that could be related. Brevard received federal funding to address its cold cases, but without the sufficient ethics to simply “run” a set of prints, the likelihood that any cold case will ever warm up is ludicrously low. Brevard’s “disdain for the slain” was made wholly apparent in the length of time it took for Sheriff Parker to respond to my requests to flesh out the information in Pauline Scandale’s case. It was obvious that he did not want anyone to be aware that there was another Cavova Beach skull-crush homicide a few years after Dillon was framed for another Canova Beach skull-crush homicide.

Crosley Green remains incarcerated although his brother (who knows how to drive a stick shift, unlike Crosley) had previously driven the truck and the hair that was Mito DNA tested was either the brother’s or harvested from Green’s cell. Mito DNA does not identify a specific individual like STR DNA, Mito only identifies maternal lineage. No legitimate forensic evidence tied Green to the homicide, and only the finger and foot prints of the homicide victim and the “eye witness” were in the truck and in the sand. The Florida Bar appointed high-powered D.C. defense counsel to represent Crosley, counsel suited to defend white collar criminals, crush whistle blowers and circumvent environmental protection laws. Their website professed a limitation on pro bono work to domestic violence only. I suspect they are in favor of it.

These five men’s stories from one Florida county alone indicate that the public trust hasn’t been breeched in-so-far as Florida crime scene evidence, it has been thoroughly betrayed, and that’s only one component of our conviction corruption.

No other Floridian has a greater sworn and fiduciary responsibility to address conviction corruption than you – per Title IV, Chapter 14, 14.01 of the Florida Statutes, below – yet you personally participated in conviction corruption by renewing former Gov. Crist’s Executive Orders that put Gary Stanley Bennett’s Brevard case in Orange County’s unclean hands, unclean from having used Preston in Linroy Bottoson’s proseuction – with FBI participation – resulting in Bottoson’s likely wrongful execution. Brevard’s current clerk of court helped the media have an excuse not to cover your personal participation by refusing to put Bennett’s case online on Brevard’s eFACTS, ridiculously asserting the age of the case made online publication impossible, despite the earlier Preston frame-ups of Juan Ramos and William Dillon appearing on eFACTS. (Wilton Dedge’s older Preston frame-up was also formerly present, but is now expunged.)

Media coverage would have revealed that Bennett’s prosecution and William “Tommy” Zeigler’s prosecution were too luridly similar to be coincidental, especially since the lead prosecutor in both was Jeff Ashton prior to his abrupt retirement. It would have revealed the Orchid Cellmark/Dillon/Bennett controversy being ignored by the same judge, as well as the controversy of it taking months for an Orange County judge to decide “yes” or “no” to allowing Ziegler additional DNA tests, although there’s only one ethical answer to allowing additional DNA tests when initial tests pointed to innocence – yes.

Because of your sworn and fiduciary responsibilities, it should be you – not me – battling the DoJ over their decades of failure to address FBI participation in conviction corruption, including any undue influence Senate President Haridopolos (as a son of a former agent involved in Brevard politics with other retired feds) may have deployed to prevent investigation of FBI ties to charlatan Preston and therefore Brevard/Seminole, Orange/Osceola and other Florida judicial circuits. It should be you fighting LabCorp’s acquisition of Orchid Cellmark to get to the bottom of the OC’s handling of Bennett’s evidence, especially since such acquisitions have driven DNA test prices up despite increasing automation, from under $32 in 2004 for STR to a scandalous $2,250 in 2012 for lesser Mito, taking months to do what used to be accomplished in days according to news reports on Ohio cases. It should be you demanding to know how Zeigler and Bennett’s theory-of-the-crime became luridly, eerily similar.

The FTC didn’t email or snail mail their deceptive letter, below, which makes it appear they had received only one letter of objectiion to LabCorp’s acquisition of Orchid Cellmark from me. I found their letter online while I was trying to figure out what to do next to counter the disinterest of the DoJ, governors, public defender organizations, defense attorney organizations, Bar associations and innocence organizations; they’re all ethically obligated to battle to make justice available via inexpensive, rapid DNA tests, but they’re no-shows, although – obviously – the time to apprehend rapists and killers is before the adjective “serial” is applicable. Each organization exempt from federal taxation that merely pretends to protect the public in criminal justice matters should retroactively lose its exemption, a matter that the IRS Oversight Board and the Treasury Department refuses to take seriously, despite the resulting carnage.

I written to two other governors about the stupefyingly slow, ridiculous rip-off of today’s DNA tests. That leaves 47 to go, and odds are that there are going to be one or two that actually care so much about public safety that will spit fire over test prices rising and time frames increasing since 2004, despite increased automation. Those governors likely won’t be happy if Florida giddily spends $2,250 for lesser tests than $32 used to buy in 2004, given that Florida is a federal DNA hub and received really big bucks in federal DNA backlog funding. Logically, your bang-for-the-buck responsibility is greater than other governors – and a reason for Florida to forfeit being a hub if flubbed.

Amnesty International stands against executing Robert Waterhouse. Author Robert Waterhouse stands against executing Robert Waterhouse. In the presence of so much conviction corruption of record, every Floridian should stand against executing Robert Waterhouse or anyone else, with you being the Floridian most emphatically against executions.

Executions under dark clouds are the most heinous of theatrics-in-lieu-of-leadership. Floridians need statesmen, not showmen. Commute Robert Waterhouse’s sentence right this minute, and get to work on ending conviction corruption and driving DNA prices and timeframes back down, Governor Scott.

Sincerely,

Susan Chandler

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/story?id=346955&page=1#.Tx6MVK6OiG4

http://www.ohio.com/news/local-news/scheduled-march-retrial-of-denny-ross-probably-headed-for-long-delay-1.254860

http://www.dna.gov/funding/dna-backlog-reduction/funding

2011 Florida Statutes: Title IV, Chapter 14, 14.01

Governor; residence; office; authority to protect life, liberty, and property.—The Governor shall reside at the head of government, and the Governor’s office shall be in the capitol. The Governor may have such other offices within the state as he or she may deem necessary. The Governor may employ as many persons as he or she, in his or her discretion, may deem necessary to procure and secure protection to life, liberty, and property of the inhabitants of the state, also to protect the property of the state.

History.—ch. 1660, 1868; RS 68; GS 69; RGS 83; CGL 104; s. 1, ch. 65-54; s. 32, ch. 95-147.

—————————–

From: Susan Chandler
Date: January 9, 2012 5:10:17 AM EST
To: Rick.Scott@eog.myflorida.com
Cc: ASKDOJ , Tampa Division
Subject: Executing Robert Waterhouse while ignoring conviction corruption

Honorable Governor Rick Scott
Office of the Governor
The Capitol
400 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor Scott,

I am writing to insist that you commute Robert Waterhouse’s death sentence, and immediately take steps towards ending Florida’s death penalty.

Over my objections, you executed Manuel Valle and Oba Chandler.

My objections to Manuel Valle’s execution (below) read in part, “1) Valle is a Cuban national, and was to be afforded benefit of contact with his government; 2) Valle has been on death row for 33 years and has known sixty (60) men who were put to death, which many judges consider to cruel and unusual punishment and a firm basis for commuting a death sentence to life imprisonment; 3) Valle was denied a transparent clemency hearing – his counsel was not present and the hearing was conducted in secrecy, 4) Governor Scott had ample time while the courts were reviewing Valle’s appeal concerning the new lethal injection protocol to legitimize the death warrant by affording Valle contact with the Cuban consul and conducting a transparent clemency hearing that was respectful of the 33 years of hell Valle has already been through in knowing 60 fellow death row inmates who were executed.”

My objections to Oba Chandler’s execution can be similarly summarized: 1) True fiscal conservatives oppose the death penalty; there is no way to justify its costs, particularly in economic downturns when its costs force cuts to education, law enforcement, the judiciary, human services and more; 2) True Christians don’t cast the first stone, let alone play God by affixing a signature to a death warrant; 3) The value of executions is in temporarily silencing the shrill voices of those who mistake vengeance for justice, as the death penalty has no deterrent value; 4) Neither your body nor soul has caller ID; chances are greater than 90% that any “Thou shalt kill” messages you receive through prayer aren’t Almighty; 5) I do not wish to have any party put blood on my hands, using my tax dollars.

Robert Waterhouse was convicted by the perjured testimony of a jailhouse informant; that and many other controversies were investigated and described in detail by another man named Robert Waterhouse … a journalist. “Robert Waterhouse by Robert Waterhouse” was published in Justice: Denied – The Magazine for the Wrongly Convicted (link below).

The article – written when former Governor Bob Graham was a U.S. Senator – indicates that executing Waterhouse would likely be another travesty … like Gerald Stano and Linroy Bottoson’s executions.

It will be author Waterhouse’s published objections that you will be ignoring this time.

You ran for governor as a businessman. Business math doesn’t support continuing the death penalty or ignoring rampant conviction corruption, nor does elementary math. You’re increasing Florida’s red ink, and some of it is blood. This makes you not a businessman, but the worst kind of politician; one with no potential to be a statesman, and great potential for yet more bloody red ink.

Commute Robert Waterhouse’s sentence, and work towards ending Florida’s death penalty.

Sincerely,

Susan Chandler

http://www.justicedenied.org/robertwaterhouse.htm

—————————–

From: Susan Chandler
Date: September 28, 2011 7:03:45 AM EDT
To: Rick.Scott@eog.myflorida.com
Cc: ASKDOJ
Subject: Manuel Valle’s 3 p.m. execution – deliberate rights violations

Attn: Warren Davis, Office of Citizen Services

Office of Governor Rick Scott
The Capitol
400 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Mr. Davis,

I was displeased to receive your response to my email to Governor Scott concerning his imprudently signing a death warrant for Manuel Valle; I’d hoped your employment was terminated upon Governor Scott’s inauguration.

Our new governor is quite disingenuous enough on his own without you adding your frustratingly furtive non-responsiveness into the mix, which I have had the distinct displeasure of receiving intermittent examples of since 2007.

To review the controversies you skirted in your response concerning Valle’s death warrant: 1) Valle is a Cuban national, and was to be afforded benefit of contact with his government; 2) Valle has been on death row for 33 years and has known sixty (60) men who were put to death, which many judges consider to cruel and unusual punishment and a firm basis for commuting a death sentence to life imprisonment; 3) Valle was denied a transparent clemency hearing – his counsel was not present and the hearing was conducted in secrecy, 4) Governor Scott had ample time while the courts were reviewing Valle’s appeal concerning the new lethal injection protocol to legitimize the death warrant by affording Valle contact with the Cuban consul and conducting a transparent clemency hearing that was respectful of the 33 years of hell Valle has already been through in knowing 60 fellow death row inmates who were executed.

To review the controversies you introduced in your response: 1) Despite your contrary claim, Governor Scott does not take his responsibilities to the incarcerated seriously … he has ignored my correspondence, including that concerning William “Tommy” Zeigler and Gary Stanley Bennett forestalled appeals, which accentuate the ongoing prosecutorial misconduct in both cases; 2) Governor Scott constituents include Buddhists, Wiccans, agnostics, atheists, etc., and his sworn oath requires him to adhere to the rule of law ahead of the tenets of his personal faith, and he has not done so in signing Valle’s death warrant, 3) While the emotions of homicide victims’ families are lawful mitigating factors in imposing the death penalty, the emotions of any party do not – at any time or under any circumstance – make it ethical to flout due process.

A official signature doesn’t legitimize a specious document, and within my knowledge, Governor Scott has signed another … an extension of the Executive Order that transferred responsibilities to prosecute Gary Bennett from the 18th judicial circuit to the 9th. Both prosecutor’s offices had used charlatan dog handler John Preston, who participated in Bennett’s Brevard case. The 9th’s stake in keeping Bennett’s frame-up intact is maintaining faux legitimacy for Linroy Bottoson’s wrongful execution.

My February 2009 email to Governor Crist that appears below the dashed line indicates you’re not a man of your word, Mr. Davis; you didn’t get back to me about investigating Brevard. Little has changed since 2009. We now have an Innocence Commission, but in name only; it isn’t investigating conviction integrity. We now have you spinning Scott’s shadiness as you once spun Crist’s; Crist signed the initial tainted Executive Order throwing Gary Bennett to Lawson Lamar’s wolves, he also signed Wayne Tompkins’ precipitous death warrant.

Putting Valle down like a rabid dog – after treating him worse than a dog for 33 years – isn’t justice. Ohio’s governor demonstrated courage in commuting Joseph Murphy’s sentence, courage that other governors lack – Texas’ governor executed Stephen Woods, Georgia’s governor executed Troy Davis, Alabama’s governor executed Derrick O’Neal Mason. Woods was innocent, Davis was most likely innocent and Mason may have been guilty, but the disavowal of the death sentence by the original presiding judge should have been a conclusive mitigating factor for commutation when added to the inhumanities and indignities Davis endured on death row.

Governor Scott should stay Valle’s execution and order a transparent clemency hearing after Valle is given the opportunity to contact the Cuban consul, not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because an increasing number of citizens are determined to see public servants that deliberately conspire to violate rights – both of citizens and foreign nationals – led away in handcuffs to serve stiff federal sentences. Your involvement in violating rights will be the sum total of all the governors you’ve issued official lies for, Mr. Davis.

Sincerely,

Susan Chandler

Ohio governor commutes sentence of death row inmate

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/27/us-ohio-deathpenalty-idUSTRE78Q01620110927

Watchdog warns Florida over dysfunctional Manuel Valle case

http://www.reprieve.org.uk/press/2011_09_23_Watchdog_warns_Florida/

From: “Governor Rick Scott”
Date: September 23, 2011 4:38:23 PM EDT
To: “Governor Rick Scott”
Subject: Thank you for contacting Governor Rick Scott

Thank you for contacting Governor Scott regarding the death penalty case of Manuel Valle. The Governor asked that I respond on his behalf.

Under Florida law, it is the Governor’s solemn duty to sign death warrants. Governor Scott takes this responsibility very seriously and is committed to following the law in as thoughtful and deliberative a manner as possible. He did so in this case.

Governor Scott has expressed that signing death warrants is one of his most difficult tasks, one that requires him to balance his Christian value of forgiveness with his obligations as Governor. After long and careful consideration of the facts and circumstances, Governor Scott concluded that clemency is not appropriate in the case of Manuel Valle. He stated that conclusion in the death warrant.

The families of the victims of the heinous crimes, for which individuals have been sentenced to death, are in Governor Scott’s thoughts and prayers as he carries out the laws of Florida.

Thank you again for taking the time to contact the Governor’s Office.

Sincerely,

Warren Davis
Office of Citizen Services

From: Susan Chandler
Date: September 19, 2011 8:42:44 AM EDT
To: Rick.Scott@eog.myflorida.com
Cc: ASKDOJ
Subject: Executing Manuel Valle without due process

Governor Rick Scott
The Capitol
400 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor Scott,

I am writing to ask that you adhere to international treaties and allow Cuban national Manuel Valle to interact with his government, and that you direct the Clemency Board – of which you are a member – to at long last conduct a clemency hearing that is not in secret and for which Valle’s counsel is present.

Valle has been on death row for 33 years, a length of time which many judges consider to cruel and unusual.

These issues – flouting international agreements, denying a transparent clemency hearing, traumatizing through warehousing Valle while 60 other death row inmates known to him were executed – should have been addressed while the legality of new lethal injection protocols was being weighed.

In addition to being thoroughly repugnant to those of us who don’t confuse vengeance with justice, the death penalty is preposterously expensive to administer, and the lengthy appeals process – quite obviously – does not ensure fairness for the convicted … it merely clogs our courts and delays justice for others.

By any interpretation, the balance sheet indicates that we can’t afford interminable, snowballing travesties. A wise man would follow Illinois lead immediately and make Florida’s death penalty go away.

Sincerely,

Susan Chandler

About Susan Chandler

Now-disabled interior/exterior designer dragged into battling conviction corruption from its periphery in a third personal battle with civil public corruption.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Gov. Scott: Don’t execute Waterhouse today, use your executive authority for public safety, not sickening sideshows

  1. Although “drag and drop” is supposed to work – if I understand WordPress correctly – the letter that the FTC wrote to me but never sent to me doesn’t appear. Anyone wishing a copy of the letter can request it via comment. Just ask me not to publish the comment if you wish your request to be anonymous. Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s